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Curriculum Vitae

 

 

Professor Michel is an expert in leadership development for CEOs, presidents, board members, and high-potential business unit leaders. She has both ivy-league academic training (Wharton Ph.D.) and practical experience in leading organizations in the US and abroad.

 

As a renowned scholar in behavioral organizational research, she analyzes a client’s specific situation, in contrast to consultants who offer standardized approaches. She provides clients with a competitive advantage by bringing to bear the latest organizational research, often years before it circulates publicly.  

 

Her research has advanced scholarship and practice. It is published in the organizational discipline’s leading outlets and is taught to other scholars in top Ph.D. programs.

 

Dr. Michel’s ideas have informed the practice of important business leaders and organizations. For example, she has worked with the Chief of Staff of Goldman Sachs to help the firm devise a new approach to executive education. 

 

The practical significance of Professor Michel’s work is further evident from the international press coverage. She has been featured in many international TV, radio, and press interviews, including CNBC/CNBC Korea, Fox News, Bloomberg TV, and NPR. In addition, over 40 other outlets have reported on her research including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, MSNBC, TIME Magazine, New York Magazine, Los Angeles Times, Forbes and other press in the US, China, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Austria, Romania, Argentina and Brazil. 

 

 

EDUCATION

 

The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

Ph.D. in Management, August 2003.

Dissertation: “How organizations think and why it matters” 

 

University of Western Ontario, Canada;

Honors B.A. Psychology & Economics, May 1992 (4.0/4.0 GPA). 

 

 

ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE

 

Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California.

September 2003 – May 2012. 

 

      Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

      September 2012 – current.

 

 

PUBLICATIONS

Michel, A.A. (in press). Researching bodies: Embodied fieldwork for knowledgework, which turns out to be embodied. In Cathy Cassell, Ann Cunliffe, and Gina Grandy (Eds), The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Business and Management Research Methods. Sage.

Michel, A.A. (in press). The bodily structuration of knowledge work: A twelve-year ethnography of Wall Street bank socialization practices and their diffusion. In Bodies and Affect in Market Societies. Anne Schmidt and Christopher Conrad (Eds.). Mohr Siebeck.

Michel, A.A. (2015). Dualism at work: The social circulation of embodiment theories in use. Signs and Society, 3: 541-569.

Michel, A.A. (2015). Promoting listening by augmenting uncertainty. In Leonard J. Waks (ed.), Listening to Teach. Beyond Didactic Pedagogy. Albany, NY: Suny. (with Stanton Wortham)

Michel, A.A. (2014). Is this culture making me look fat? Book review of Review of I. Tischner: Fat Lives. A feminist psychological exploration. Theory and Psychology, 24: 731-733.

Michel, A.A. (2014). Participation and self-entrapment: A 12-year ethnography of Wall Street participation practices’ diffusion and evolving consequences. The Sociological Quarterly, 55: 514-536.

Michel, A.A. (2014). The mutual constitution of persons and organizations: An ontological perspective on organization change. Organization Science, 25 (4): 1082-1111.

Michel, A.A. (2014). Book review of Steven G. Mandis: What happened to Goldman Sachs: An insider's story of organizational drift and its unintended consequences. Administrative Science Quarterly.

Michel, A.A. (2013). Book review of Melissa S. Fisher: Wall Street Women. Administrative Science Quarterly, September: 58: 487-490.

·         Ranked among the journal’s most widely-read publications

 

Michel, A.A. (2011). Transcending socialization: A nine-year ethnography of the body’s role in organizational control and knowledge worker transformation. Administrative Science Quarterly: 54: 1-44.

·         Lead article

·         Ranked among the journal’s most widely-read papers

 

Michel, A.A. and S.E.F. Wortham (2009). “Bullish on uncertainty: How organizational cultures change participants.” Ethnographic book manuscript. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

 

Michel, A.A. (2007). A distributed cognition perspective on newcomers’ change processes: The management of cognitive uncertainty in two investment banks. Administrative Science Quarterly, 52: 507-557.

·         Lead article

·         Ranked among the journal’s most widely-read papers

 

Michel, A.A. and S.E.F. Wortham (2007). Listening beyond the self: How schools and other organizations create direct involvement. Learning Inquiry, 1(2): 89-97.

 

Michel, A.A. and K.A. Jehn (2005). About the “I” in the EI construct: A more social approach to intelligence and its performance implications. In V. Druskat, F. Sala, & G. Mount (Eds.), Linking Emotional Intelligence and Performance at Work: Current Research Evidence with Individuals and Groups (pp. 185-222) San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

 

Michel, A.A. (2004). “Rummaging in words”. Theory & Psychology, 14(4): 562-568.

 

Michel, A.A. and K.A. Jehn (2003). The dark side of identification: Overcoming identification-induced performance impediments. In E. Mannix, J. Polzer, & M. Neale (Eds.), Research on Managing Groups and Teams: Identity Issues in Groups (Volume 5, pp. 189-219). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.

 

Michel, A.A. and S.E.F. Wortham (2002). Clearing away the self. Theory & Psychology, 12(5), 625-650.

              

 

WORK-IN-PROGRESS

 

Michel, A.A. “Knowledge work as physical labor: How organizations control the body’s role in intellectual performance.” Ethnographic book monograph under contract for Princeton University Press.

 

Michel, A.A. “The emotional structuration of capitalism.” Invited chapter for book manuscript.

 

Michel, A.A. “Embodiment as a paradigm for the study of self, culture, and cognition.” Theory paper.

 

Michel, A.A. “Layers of culture: The imprinting of career trajectories.” Based on an ongoing qualitative study (12-year data collection completed so far).

 

 

PRESENTATIONS

 

Michel, A.A. and S.E.F. Wortham (2013). Mind, body, and banking: The cultural historical plasticity of the body’s role in action. Presentation at EGOS, Montreal.

 

Michel, A.A. (2011). Transcending socialization: A nine-year ethnography of the body’s role in organizational control and knowledge worker transformation. Presentation at Yale University’s Department of Anthropology and Social Theory.

 

Michel, A.A. (2010). The limits of socialization: Agency as the body’s response to organizational control.” Presentation at University of Michigan.

 

Michel, A.A. (2010). Freedom to be dominated by the body: Social creativity as the body’s response to organizational control. Presentation at University of California, Irvine’s Center for Organizational Research.

 

Wortham, S.E.F. and A.A. Michel (2010). Bullish on uncertainty: Imagining adaptable educational organizations. Presentation at University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education.

 

Michel, A.A. (2010). Bullish on uncertainty: Uncertainty as an asset. Presentation at the Wharton Executive Conference on Leadership. Philadelphia.

 

Michel, A.A. (2009). Innovation under uncertainty. Presentation at Elliott Maisie’s Learning 2009, Orlando.

 

Michel, A.A. (2009). The dynamic intersection of cognitive theory, organizational strategy, and socialization. Presentation at the Wharton Business School’s Annual OB Conference, Philadelphia.

 

Michel, A.A. (2009). Real-time strategy: The structure of adaptive individual and organizational cognition. Presentation at the Ivey Business School, University of Western Ontario, London.

 

Michel, A.A. (2009). The distributed dynamics of adaptive cognition: Institutional, organizational, and embodied  processes. Presentation at the AOM meeting in Chicago.

 

Michel, A.A. (2009). Thriving under uncertainty: Lessons from Wall Street. ASTD Conference, Washington.

 

Michel, A.A. (2008). Bullish on uncertainty: How Wall Street investment banks transform participants and why it matters. Presentation to the Harvard Business School Strategy Unit.

 

Michel, A.A. and S.E.F. Wortham (2008). Theories in the wild: Traditional cognitive and socio-cultural theories as practice. Presentation at the ISCAR conference, San Diego, CA.

 

Michel, A.A. (2008). The agency of academic theories: Traditional and sideways cultures in theories-as-practice. Presentation at the meeting of the Academy of Management, Anaheim, CA.

 

Wortham, S.E.F. and A.A. Michel (2008). Listening as attention to heterogeneous resources. Presentation at the AERA conference, New York, NY.

 

Michel, A.A. & S.E.F. Wortham (2005). Direct involvement: How thinking takes place in organizations. Presentation at the ISCAR conference, Sevilla, Spain.

 

Michel, A.A. & K.A. Jehn (2005). About the ‘I’ in the EI construct.  Presentation at themeeting of the Academy of Management, Oahu.

 

Michel, A.A. & S.E.F. Wortham (2005). “Contact with the world” An almost phenomenological approach to cognition and emotion. Presentation at the meeting of the Society for Psychological Anthropology, San Diego, CA.

 

Michel, A.A. (2005). The limits of shared cognition: How identification makes the subjective objective. European Conference on Identities, University of Leiden, Netherlands. 

 

Michel, A.A. (2005). On how to be ethical without trying: Lessons from Wall Street. Presentation at UCLA Templeton Lecture Series on Ethics, Los Angeles, CA.

 

Michel, A.A. & S.E.F. Wortham (2003). What embodiment reveals about culture and self that semiotics conceals. Meeting of the Society for Psychological Anthropology, San Diego, CA.

 

Michel, A.A. (2002). More than meets the “I”: Emotion and intuition as alternative self-theories and their consequences for group performance. Academy of Sciences Conference, New York, NY. 

 

Michel, A.A. (2002). “How can you tell the dancer from the dance?”: Embodiment, culture, and agency. Annual Meeting of American Anthropological Association, New Orleans, Louisiana.

 

Michel, A.A. & K.A. Jehn (2001). The dark side of identification: Overcoming identification-induced distortion. Annual Conference on Managing Groups and Teams, Ithaca, NY.

 

Michel, A.A. & S.E.F. Wortham (2001). A phenomenological perspective on culture:  “Contact with the world at the very heart of the being of consciousness”. Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

 

Michel, A.A. (2000). Beyond the thinker in thought: Attributes and determinants of collective mind.  Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Toronto, Canada.

 

Michel, A.A. (2000). Antecedents and consequences of different types of conflict.  Annual Meeting of the International Association for Conflict Management. 

 

Michel, A.A. & I. MacMillan (1997). Is rent insulation possible? Conference on Entrepreneurship.  Montreal, Canada.

 

 

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

 

The University of Southern California, Marshall School

Organizational Behavior, undergraduate required for Business Scholars (capstone course) (BUAD 304).

Managerial Perspectives, graduate required course (GBS 522 a and b).

Professional Service Firms, undergraduate and graduate elective course (BUAD 499, MOR 599).

Innovations in Strategy and Leadership (Graduate elective).

Seminar in Organizational Behavior, doctoral course (MOR 601).

 

University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education

Chief Learning Officer Executive Education Program

Med Ed Executive Education Program

 

The Wharton Business School, University of Pennsylvania

Lecturer, Management 101.

 

 

COMMUNITY SERVICE

 

Editorial boards: Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Science

Co-Chair: Being there/being them, Professional Development Workshop on ethnographic writing, Academy of Management Meeting, Chicago, 2009 and 2010.

Chair, Session on “Embodiment and Language” at Neurobiology of “The Good Life”, Conference at UCLA, April 2004

 

 

GRANTS, HONORS, AND AWARDS

 

“Top Gun” Award for Excellence in Research, Teaching and Service (2007/8), Management and Organization Department, University of Southern California. Given yearly to the faculty who excelled on all of these three dimensions.

Grant, Undergraduate Research Proposal, University of Southern California ($9,000)

Grant, Undergraduate Research Proposal, University of Southern California ($9,800).

Grant, Wharton Center for Leadership, University of Pennsylvania ($5,000).

Fellowship, Snider Entrepreneurial Center at Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania ($8,000).

The Chancellor’s Prize, UWO, for best student graduating from Social Science Honors Program.

W.J. McClelland Award, UWO, for most outstanding Senior Honors Thesis.  Presented Honors Thesis at Annual Meeting of American Psychological Society.

R.B. Liddy Gold Medal, UWO, for highest average in fourth year psychology.

F.W. Burd Scholarship, UWO, for highest average in third year psychology.

John McKiel Memorial Prize, UWO, for highest average in first year psychology.

Huron Corporation Scholarship, UWO, (every year) for highest overall average.

Dean’s Honor List, UWO, (every year).

David Anderson Prize, UWO, for excellence in administering behavior modification.

 

 

WORK EXPERIENCE

 

Goldman, Sachs & CO., Training and Development (1995-1996), New York, USA. I worked with the Chief of Staff to implement a new human resources strategy. This involved investigating the sources of the bank’s effectiveness through internal interviews, observation, and data analyses as well as through benchmarking it to other organizations.

Goldman, Sachs & CO., Banker in the Mergers and Acquisitions Department (1992-1994), New York, USA. Directly promoted from analyst to associate.

Citibank, Customer Service Representative (Summer 1991), Paris, France.

Robert Bosch GmbH, Marketing (Summer 1990), Stuttgart, Germany.

Nixdorf Computer AG, Communications (Summer 1989), Paderborn, Germany.

Dresdner Bank AG, Certified Commercial Banker (1986-1988), Duesseldorf, Germany.

 

 

LANGUAGES: English, French, German, Latin.